Mozambique

Vanderbilt Out of Africa

Tennessee students win a divestment fight–even though the school won’t admit it.

 

 

The Scramble for African Land

 

According to the author of the book, "The Land Grabbers" Mr. Fred Peace, of all the agricultural land, none is as accessible as the Guinea Savannah Belt; a great expanse of grasslands half the size of the United States, occupying an arc of 25 countries between the rainforest and the deserts - through west Africa to Sudan, then south through Kenya and Ethiopia to Zambia and Mozambique in the south. The World Bank calls these 1.5million square miles the 'world's "last large reserves of under used land."

How Politicians Gave Away $100bn of Land

 

With minimal consultation, governments and local authorities are signing away huge tracts of lands for lease on the cheap. Now communities are raising their voices in opposition to these projects that bring little local development.

Mozambique Farmland Is Prize In Land Grab Fever

 

By Dan Charles

 

Listen to audio

First of a two-part series. Read part 2.

 

In these days of financial uncertainty, the hot new investment tip is farmland.

Understanding Land Investment Deals in Africa: Mozambique

Mozambique’s history of Portuguese colonialism, three wars, and then the imposition by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund of a harsh neo-liberal economic model led the government in the 1990s to accept the idea that the only way to promote development and end poverty was through encouraging foreign investment. Mozambique was identified by the World Bank as one of five sparsely populated African countries with large tracts of land available for rainfed cultivation. After 2000 rising food and fuel prices and new climate change-related attention on forests triggered the interest of investors in Mozambique, particularly for trees (for paper, timber and carbon credits) and agrofuels (notably sugar and jatropha).

Land Deal Brief: EmVest Asset Management in Matuba, Mozambique

EmVest Asset Management is a joint venture between Emergent Asset Management and Grainvest, a subsidiary of the RussellStone Group. Based out of Pretoria, South Africa, EmVest operates the African Land Fund (ALF) and lists social responsibility as a guiding tenet of its investment strategy, citing a desire to bring “economic uplift to communities through commercially viable, first world practices.”

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